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Speakers in the Schools 2017-2019

Important AZ Speaks Notice

The new AZ Speaks catalog is available for booking programs between Nov 1, 2017 – Oct 31, 2018.

Arizona Kicks on Route 66

U.S. Route 66, known as the “Mother Road,” was built in 1926. It ran from Chicago to L. A. During the depression of the 1930s, it became the major path by which people migrated west, seeking work, warm weather and new opportunities. Shore shares the history of Route 66 in Arizona, including the impact it had on the state during its prime, and what happened when the interstate ultimately bypassed some of the towns that drew life from the road. This multi-media presentation includes music, video clips, still photos, and Shore’s storytelling magic.

  • Speaker – Marshall Shore
  • Presentation Category – History- Arizona/Southwest
Arizona Outlaws and the Law

Taking the events from Billy the Kid, who killed his first man in Arizona, the Gunfight at the OK Corral, and the arrest and trial of Ernesto Miranda, this presentation will explore how these seminal events became watershed experiences for the American legal system, and still impact the lives of individuals living in the United States today. This presentation will explore the development of the legal system and law enforcement in the Southwest beginning with frontier justice and finishing with our current legal system, which continues to evolve and grow.

  • Speaker – R. Casey Davis
  • Presentation Category – History – Arizona/Southwest
Asia’s Unique Culture:  A Visual Trip Across A Mystical Continent

From bustling Hong Kong, to the opulent Grand Palace of Bangkok, to the world’s tallest building in Dubai, to the slums of Mumbai, this highly visual presentation will explore the culture, cuisine, and customs of this fascinating and rapidly changing region.  Dan Fellner, an experienced travel writer and Fulbright Fellow in Asia, will share his experiences and in-depth observations from his extensive travels to such diverse countries as Vietnam, Myanmar, India, Thailand, Taiwan and Indonesia.  The presentation will both inform and entertain you and perhaps even motivate you to travel to this exotic continent.

  • Speaker – Dan Fellner
  • Presentation Category – Geography & Environment
Arizona Stories: Frontier Characters and Communities

From mammoth hunters and canal builders to Native Americans, Hispanics, Americans, Irish, Serbians, and just about every nationality under the sun, Arizona has always been a land of many cultures. And while the Earps and the Geronimo are world famous, Arizona can also be proud of its unsung men and women and cooperative communities. Here we will share Arizona’s experiences from the famous to the little known, from Native American cermonies to mining booms, cattle drives, cotton harvests, and religious settlements, we will learn how Arizona evolved from a violent frontier to a just and civil society dedicated to its people’s welfare.

  • Speaker – Jim Turner
  • Presentation Category – History – Arizona/Southwest
Arizona’s Wild Myths and Legends

Wyatt earp, Billy the Kid and John Wayne: what do these famous characters have in common? They are not who we think they are because of the legends that have grown up around them. From the 1860’s dime novels to the books, movies, and television shows, writers have altered, exaggerated and sometimes lied about these folk heroes.  In “The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance,” the editor says, “When the legend becomes fact, print the legend.” We will examine how the legends grew and how they impact how we view the past, act in the present, and build the future.

  • Speaker – Jim Turner
  • Presentation Category – History – Arizona/Southwest
Bands of Sisters: U.S. Women’s Military Bands during WW II

The novelty of these bands—initially employed by the U.S. military to support bond drives—drew enough spectators for the bands to be placed on tour, raising money for the war and boosting morale. The women, once discharged at the war’s end, refused to fade into post-war domesticity. Instead, the strong bond fostered by youthful enthusiasm and the rare opportunity to serve in the military while making professional caliber music would come to last some 60 years. Based on interviews with over 70 surviving band members, Bands of Sisters tells the tale of this remarkable period in the history of American women.

  • Speaker – Jill Sullivan
  • Presentation Category – Arts, Architecture & Music
Celebrating Black History

This is an interactive workshop that explores influential and little known African American contributions and the road they paved to make it possible for African American leaders we have today such as Oprah Winfry, Michael Jordan, and Maya Angelou.

  • Speaker – Tamika Lamb-Sanders
  • Presentation Category – Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – African American
Father Kino: Journey to Discovery

Father Kino bridged the gap between the Anglo world and the Native American through his charismatic and caring heart. He was a cartographer, explorer, geographer, scientist, and a man with a mission. Through his knowledge of agriculture, he introduced new livestock breeds and taught animal husbandry to the native to increase the stock. The new plants and fruit trees he brought to the New World gave the native a variety of foods to eat and increased their ability to withstand seasonal changes. Father Kino brought a new religion to the native in a nonthreatening manner. His scientific knowledge allowed him to make new discoveries.

  • Speaker – Barbara Jaquay
  • Presentation Category – History – Arizona/Southwest
Four Cold-Weather Travel Destinations to Help Break the Arizona Heat

Looking to vicariously escape the 100+ degree Arizona temperatures?  Then take a trip through the eyes of a travel writer to four chilly and off-the-beaten path destinations – Greenland, Spitsbergen, Iceland, and Canada’s Yukon Territory.  Greenland offers an interesting mix of Inuit and Scandinavian culture, Spitsbergen is about as close to the North Pole as you can get, Iceland is one of the most ruggedly beautiful islands on Earth, and the Yukon is known for gold-mining and spectacular scenery and wildlife. Dan Fellner, has written about and photographed all four destinations for the Arizona Republic’s Travel & Explore section.

  • Speaker – Dan Fellner
  • Presentation Category – Geography & Environment
Hi Jolly and Mystery of the US Army Camel Corps

This presentation will explore the US Army’s experiment with using camel from the Middle East to make it more mobile in the newly acquired Southwest.  In order to teach the soldiers about camels, a local from the Middle East, who was called Hi Jolly, was shipped over with the camels.  Even though Secretary of War Jefferson Davis desperately wanted the Camel Corps to be successful, the experiment was a failure.  Find out what happened to the camels and their minder, Hi Jolly, with the conclusion of this experiment.

  • Speaker – R. Casey Davis
  • Presentation Category – History – United States
How the Piano Keyboard Changed the World

Invented in Ancient Greece, keyboards allow an individual to play all the voices or music, replacing an orchestra or a choir. Keyboards are such a powerfully disruptive technology that they changed the very language of music, and allowed for some of the most beautiful music in human history to be created. Found all over the world, the keyboard is one of the most democratizing forces in music, allowing music to be experienced and created by all societal groups. There is a dark side, however! The pervasiveness of keyboards has taken Western music across the globe, often crushing indigenous music. This presentation will include musical examples from many time periods and across the planet.

  • Speaker – Guy Whatley
  • Presentation Category – Arts, Architecture & Music
In Her Shoes: Celebrating Women’s History

During this workshop students will have the opportunity to learn about the historical achievements of popular U.S American women, in addition to contributions made by African America, Latino, and Native American women. Additionally, students will learn about the social and political background surrounding each woman presented in order to understand why their achievements and contributions were considered significant. The timeline will cover events such as the Seneca Falls Conference, the Women’s Suffrage Movement, World War II, the Civil Rights Movement, and women in key leadership positions today. Teachers will be given worksheets and projects that students can do once the presentation ends.

  • Speaker – Tamika Lamb-Sanders
  • Presentation Category – Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – Women’s Studies
Language and Culture Clash

Roman Jacobson stated that languages differ not in what they can covey but what they have to convey. Thus English has to refer to  either foot or leg while Slavic languages can use нога/noga/noha for both, and Mandarin Chinese has to differentiate between younger and older brother (dìdì, 弟弟and gēgē, 哥哥)  while English covers both with the word brother. These cases exemplify different manners in which the world is construed in various languages and their cultures. In this talk, based on the Sipka’s recent monograph with Cambridge University Press, he presents a taxonomy of such cases and discusses their practical consequences.”

  • Speaker – Dank Sipka
  • Presentation Category – Literature/Linguistics
LGBTQ: A History in Arizona

Arizona’s history of the LGBTQ community begins long before Arizona was a state with the Native American belief of two-spirits, continues on through to the seismic shift of Marriage Equality. There are some surprises along the way as we talk about artists such as Keith Haring and George Quaintance. There is also the little known story of Nicolai De Raylan. This multi-media presentation includes music, video clips, still photos, and Shore’s storytelling magic.

  • Speaker – Marshall Shore
  • Presentation Category – Humanities in Contemporary Issues
Origins of Civil Rights

Race has been a much-contested issue in U.S. history. Yet it has never been a single thing nor has it always been the same thing. Race has been part of a changing national identity. More personally, race has been part of variable individual identity. Who was white, who was Indian, who was black, for example, has not always had the same answer in U.S. history. Yet race has been a persistent element of identity. Every generation of Americans has wrestled with race as a defining issue. It has been long argued over in United States law. It has been crucial in national and local politics and has presented problems aplenty for government, public policy, and popular practice.

  • Speaker – T.J. Davis
  • Presentation Category – Humanities in Contemporary Issues
“Protecting a Way of Life” Kinship Responsibilities

Royce Manuel (Akimel O’odham) best describes his work through the “Tools of Yesterday” using plant fiber, primitive bows & arrows, knapping stone, and making agave plant cordage. As a tribal and cultural educator and member of the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, Royce and Debbie specializes in the revival and teaching of artistic traditions while renewing and protecting indigenous knowledge for generations to come. Debbie’s traditional and bi-cultural lifestyles, provides valuable insight and practices in both urban and tribal community settings while preserving their heritage.

  • Speaker – Royce and Debbie Manuel
  • Presentation Category – Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – Native American
Sheep Ranchers and Herders of Arizona

Sheep ranching has been greatly overlooked in the history of Arizona. While it never will compete with the five “C’s”, it added a great deal to the economic diversity in the state. Many different ethnic groups settled here and raised sheep for a living weathering the economic downturns as well as the prosperous years. They often weathered the storm better than cattlemen. These men and women raised their families on the frontier and left a lasting impact on the economic and ethnic diversity within the state. The story of the sheep industry is told through personal family memoirs collected over several years. The cyclical cycle taken each year will be shown in a photographic journey.

  • Speaker – Barbara Jaquay
  • Presentation Category – History – Arizona/Southwest
The Diamond Jubilee of Cadet Nurses in Arizona: Stories of Service

July 1, 2018, marks the 75th anniversary of the establishment of the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps, an innovation for its time that addressed an acute healthcare delivery crisis during World War II. This presentation draws from the voices of those who participated in the program. Participants will have the opportunity to view and discuss Cadet Nurses’ accounts of their experiences. Through discussion of these experiences, participants will learn about the meaning of Cadet Nurses’ service during and after World War II. Participants will also learn about interviewing Cadet Nurses they may know and resources for the preparation and archiving of these stories for posterity.

  • Speaker – Elsie Szecsy
  • Presentation Category – History- United States
The Holocaust and Its Memory

The Nazis in Germany committed the worst crimes against humanity in world history. The Holocaust will remain in our collective memory and reminds us constantly of the profound dangers that threaten modern society.  Democracy is a fragile construct. This presentation analyzes the causes and conditions for the rise of the Nazis in Germany, and traces the horrible history of the Holocaust through maps, images, and texts, focusing also on the culture practiced today in Germany in a most moving way. There is probably no other lesson from the twentieth century more important to keep in mind today than what we know about the Holocaust.

  • Speaker – Albrecht Classen
  • Presentation Category – History – World
The Magic of the Middle Ages: Lessons from the Past

The Middle Ages were not a dark ages, which is really just a modern myth. This presentation will highlight some of the glorious and mysterious aspects from that time, working with fascinating texts, images, music, architecture, magical arts, philosophy, and religion, as well as addressing problematic issues and conflicts. Some of those pertain to the relationship between Jews and Christians, the crusades, multilingualism, the issue of toleration/tolerance, and the quest for God, especially through mystical visions. The focus will also rest on the most glorious art works from that time period, such as illustrated manuscripts, which will be accompanied by samples of medieval music.

  • Speaker – Albrecht Classen
  • Presentation Category – History – World
The Mysteries of the Harpsichord

Although stereotyped as an unmusical machine only fit for The Addams Family, the harpsichord is the most expressive and subtle of musical instruments. It has a unique and beautiful repertoire, and a very special and distinctive playing style. In this session, Dr. Guy Whatley will demonstrate the stunning music written for the harpsichord, and the astonishing techniques needed to bring it to life in the twenty-first century. We will also explore the societies and intriguing personalities connected to the harpsichord’s history, and we will come full circle and see how the harpsichord is a vibrant and living instrument today.

  • Speaker – Guy Whatley
  • Presentation Category – Arts, Architecture & Music
The River People’s Landscape

The presentation will describe the historical landscape including plants, people, river and surrounding mountains. “The way of life” is how many elders described everyday activity that involved chores, work in the fields, seasonal storytelling, seasonal harvesting and craft making of baskets, bows, and arrows. Come take a journey about the River People who live in the desert.

  • Speaker – Royce and Debbie Manuel
  • Presentation Category – Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – Native American
The Three Rs of language Development: Rhythm, Rhyme, and Repetition

From infants to the young at heart, our languages are evolving continuously. Let Polly and the Peaputts, Maddy and her daddy, and other Rodowrites characters, help you discover how to live, love, and learn with language. “Polly and the Peaputts” is a book series of fun adventures. “My Maddy, My Daddy” has two versions—English and Spanish. “Find Your Nose” is body discovery songbook for early development. Participants have opportunities to explore language through five development areas—listening/observing, speaking, reading, writing, and maybe even some acting out. All six books are also aligned with the English Language Arts Standards (ELAS) of the national Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

  • Speaker – Rodo Sofranac
  • Presentation Category – Literature/Linguistic
The U.S. Constitution: What It Says and How It Works

Most Americans think they know what the Constitution says but few have actually examined it. Here is an opportunity to review the concepts and composition of the document that functions as the legal foundation and framework of the nation. The Constitution provides principles for federal relations with the nation’s constituent states, citizens, and inhabitants. It has deployed a constitutional system called federalism. Its hallmarks have featured dual sovereignty, delegated and reserved powers, and guarantees of personal civil liberties and rights.

  • Speaker – T.J. Davis
  • Presentation Category – Humanities in Contemporary Issues
Women’s Bands in America Performing Music and Gender

Women’s Bands in America is the first comprehensive exploration of women’s bands across the three centuries in American history. Sullivan will trace women’s emerging roles in society as seen through women’s bands—concert and marching—spanning three centuries of American history. The author will explore town, immigrant, industry, family, school, suffrage, military, jazz, and rock bands, adopting a variety of methodologies and theoretical lenses in order to assemble and interrogate their findings within the context of women’s roles in American society over time. The presenter brings together a series of disciplines in this unique work, including music education, musicology and American history.

  • Speaker – Jill Sullivan
  • Presentation Category – Arts, Architecture & Music
AZ Speaks Catalogs
Questions?

Dyadira “Yadi” Fajardo, Programs and Grants Coordinator

602-257-0335 x23 or dfajardo@azhumanities.org