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AZ Speaks

Given the current global pandemic, AZ Speaks programs are now being offered virtually. Please note there will be no live AZ Speaks offered until further notice in the interest of public safety.

Our new Virtual AZ Speaks are hosted by AZ Speakers and local libraries/museums and span a total of 60-minutes. The program is a great way for non-profits, libraries, educational institutions, governmental and tribal entities to enjoy interesting and engaging humanities-based programs. AZ Speakers represent a diverse range of expertise, from a variety of professional backgrounds including history, gender studies, cultural studies, and more. Speakers are selected based on their expertise and ability to offer content and insight that inspires discussion with audiences of all ages and backgrounds.

Arizona Humanities is currently accepting applications for presentations taking place November 1, 2020 through October 31, 2021. Organizations can book up to 5 AZ Speaks presentations per fiscal year.

SCHEDULING A VIRTUAL AZ Speaks Program

HOW
Please refer to these directions.

  • Go to www.azhumanities.org and use the online dashboard. As always, you must be registered with an account. Please note that the Application Requirements, Presentation Information, and Payment Procedures forms have all been updated.

  • Call the speaker and select the date and time for your program.

  • Complete and submit the online application form. AH staff will schedule the program with our ZOOM account and send you a link to both the meeting and the program recording.

REGISTRATION
Once the program has been approved, you will receive a link to the meeting. This is new and important. You will use the link when you market and promote the program. The link will allow participants to register for the program in advance. It will require them to enter their name and email address. Following registration, participants will receive an electronic confirmation. They will use this information to participate in the program. This process allows AH to protect the security of the program and reduce hacking, ZOOM bombing, or other program disruptions. You may not use your own ZOOM account or other virtual platform to register participants. This is strictly prohibited.

VIRTUAL PROGRAMS
The virtual AZ Speaks available are listed below. Topics previously offered are no longer available. You will need to cancel any old programs and reschedule new topics only. Please note that the introductions to each of these programs are now pre-recorded. The brief recorded intro is followed by a live interactive program with the Speaker. 

If you are interested in hosting a virtual AZ Speaks program, please follow the steps below:

  1. Review the AZ Speaks Catalog and select the speaker(s) and presentation(s) you are interested in hosting.
  2. Contact the speaker to schedule his or her participation. Speaker contact information is available in the Speakers Catalog under the Speaker’s Bio.
  3. Apply through the Grants and Programs Dashboard and complete the online application form. You must contact the speaker and submit your application at least four weeks before the presentation is to take place.
  1. Complete Program Agreement & Make Payment, once the application has been approved. You will receive a notification of approval through an email confirmation. (Allow two weeks for your application to be processed.)
    • The Program Agreement and $100 Cost Share fee are due one week after approval of the application. Either pay by PayPal or send a check via mail to 1242 N Central Ave, Phoenix 85004.
    • Organizations are allowed to schedule up to 5 AZ Speaks programs per fiscal year (Nov 1 – Oct 31).
  1. Manage your AZ Speaks Program through the Host Site Toolkit (below), which provides materials and resources to successfully administer, promote, and evaluate your program(s).
  2. Complete Project Director Evaluation and submit Audience Evaluations through the Grants and Programs Dashboard.
    • Project Director Evaluation is due one week after the presentation date.

Virtual AZ Speaks Topics

VIRTUAL Arizona’s Great Escape with Steve Renzi

Nazi’s on the loose. During the night of Christmas Eve in 1944, twenty-five German prisoners of war escaped from Papago Park POW camp on the outskirts of Phoenix and headed towards Mexico. These men were hardcore Nazis, ex U-boat commanders and submariners, who had successfully dug a nearly 200-foot underground tunnel that took four months to complete. The terror of angst and war was brought home to the people of Arizona. Many people may have heard of this event, but know little of the details. This presentation tells the story of what happened to these German POWs and the Arizona residents who encountered them.

Steve Renzi, a University of Arizona graduate with a degree in history, believes that every generation must learn about who and what came before them or else the lessons learned are lost. As a writer and photographer with a teacher’s certificate in secondary education, Renzi is always searching for new ways of exploring our history. He has been published in over 200 magazine and newspaper articles and is currently a writing and photography teacher, as well as a basketball coach.

Contact Info: stevenrenzi@hotmail.com / (520) 327-3089

VIRTUAL The Ballad of Arizona with Jay Craváth and Dan Schilling

Originally conceived to celebrate Arizona’s Centennial in 2012, “The Ballad of Arizona” has been updated to provide a more complete survey of important, but often little-known, chapters of our state’s unique history. A blend of music, video, and lecture, “The Ballad of Arizona” is similar to “A Prairie Home Companion” but with an Arizona twist. The dozen vignettes featured in the presentation include the Buffalo Soldiers, dude ranch history, the Code Talkers, forester Aldo Leopold, Japanese-American Internment, famous cattle drives, the assassination of reporter Don Bolles, and more stories that celebrate Arizona’s unique cultural and natural diversity. Dan Shilling is joined by long-time AH speaker Jay Craváth for this entertaining two-person presentation that combines song and story.

Jay Craváth, Ph.D. is a composer, writer, and scholar in the field of music and Indigenous studies. He crafts programs from these interests into interactive discussions that include stories, musical performance, and illustrations/photography. One of his most recent publication is Iretaba: Mohave Chief and American Diplomat. Dr. Craváth will begin an Arizona tour in late May of 2017 for his latest album: Songs for Ancient Days.

Contact Info: cravath@gmail.com / (928) 231-9754

Dan Schilling is the former executive director of Arizona Humanities, where he worked for nearly 20 years. Since leaving AH, Shilling has co-directed three NEH summer institutes on environmental ethics, given dozens of presentations on place-based economic development, and authored or edited several publications, including Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Learning from Indigenous Methods for Environmental Sustainability(Cambridge 2018). A former high school teacher, Dan holds a PhD in literature from ASU. He has served on dozens of boards and commissions. To acknowledge his many contributions to the state, ASU presented him its most prestigious honor, the Distinguished Alumnus Award.

VIRTUAL Coded Messages and Songs of the Underground Railroad with Dr. Tamika Sanders

Communication and secrecy were key to the successful operation of the Underground Railroad. Safety was more important than quickness. Therefore, both fugitive slaves and members of the Underground Railroad learned to code and decode hidden messages, to disguise signs and to avoid capture. There were code names for towns on the routes and code numbers for towns. There were signs and songs. A quilt hanging on a clothesline with a house and a smoking chimney among its designs indicated a safe house. The song, “Follow the Drinking Gourd” served as directions to Canada. Using storytelling, activities and songs, this presentation will depict the ingenuity and resiliency used by those involved in the Underground Railroad to help over 100,000 slaves escape to freedom between 1810 and 1850.

Dr. Tamika Sanders is an entrepreneur who decided to become an educator to help address the lack of minority faculty in higher education, and serve as a role model for minority students who rarely see people of color in academia. Through her company Savvy Pen, Dr. Sanders prides herself on working with schools to build inclusive classrooms, conducting multicultural training for educators, and creating interactive programs that incorporate arts learning to bridge cultural and socioeconomic divides. She hopes to continue using the arts to break barriers, unite people, and create social change.

Contact Info: info@savvypen.com / (480) 266-9747

VIRTUAL China Mary: History and Legend with Li Yang

During the 1880s, Tombstone had a population of about 400 Chinese. The best-known was China Mary. She was the wife of Ah Lum, a partner with Quong Kee (another notable Chinese person from Tombstone history) in the town’s famous Can-Can Restaurant, the hangout for Wyatt Earp and his gang. An astute businesswoman, she became the Dragon Lady in the eyes of her white neighbors. Not only did she run her own store, controlled opium dens and gambling, but also acted as the middle person to secure jobs for her Chinese compatriots in the white community. She collected their wages and always took a commission from their pay. China Mary was also famous for her generosity. Her kindness to those in need was legend around Tombstone. When China Mary died in 1906, the town folks had a large turnout for her service. She was buried in Tombstone’s Boothill Cemetery.

Li is currently a faculty associate at Arizona State University. She was an AZ Speaks Road Scholar from 2015 through 2017. A recipient of the C. L. Sonnichsen Award for best article in The Journal of Arizona History in 2011, her writings, concerning topics ranging from Chinese history to Chinese-American history, have appeared in The Journal of Arizona History and some major magazines and newspapers in both Taiwan and mainland China. Li received her doctorate in East Asian studies from the University of Arizona in 2004. Since graduation, she has taught at several institutions, including Embrey-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott.

Contact Info: yangli200683@gmail.com / (520) 248-7792

VIRTUAL Coming Home to a Place You’ve Never Been: Immigration, Refugee Resettlement and Citizenship with Rodo Sofranac

The politics and policies of immigration, refugee resettlement, and citizenship are louder than ever. While the politics get noisier and the policies are mired, what about the people? This talk focuses on the personal stories of immigration. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss and share their experiences as a new settler and/or native greeter. What’s it like going to a place where you don’t know the language or culture? Where you don’t have any family or friends? Where you don’t know what you’re eating or where you’re sleeping? Where you have almost no money in your pocket? And now it is your home!? Could you do it? Did you do it? How is it going for you?

Rodo spent his first few years in a tiny village called Rijeka Crnojevića, Montenegro—former Yugoslavia. His family fled to Austria and later immigrated to the United States. He speaks, reads, and writes Serbo-Croatian and German. Interestingly, the Montenegrin connection brought him to Arizona in 1974. This diversity of cultures and languages inspires Rodo to read, write, and enjoy sharing stories. As a teacher, translator, mentor, and community organizer, he has worked with people of all ages—from birth to over 100—and in numerous settings, including over 30 years at the university level. Rodo‘s award-wining work embraces varied storytelling, the latest being eight fun children’s books.

Contact Info: rodowrites@cox.net / 602-992-5547

VIRTUAL The Food of Arizona with Gregory McNamee

Consider the taco, that favorite treat, a staple of Mexican and Mexican American cooking and an old standby on an Arizonan’s plate. The corn in the tortilla comes from Mexico, the cheese from the Sahara, the lettuce from Egypt, the onion from Syria, the tomatoes from South America, the chicken from Indochina, the beef from the steppes of Eurasia. The foods of Arizona speak to the many cultures, native and newcomer, that make up our state. Join Gregory McNamee, the author of Tortillas, Tiswin, and T-Bones: A Food History of the Southwest, in exploring these many traditions.

Gregory McNamee is a writer, editor, photographer, and publisher. He is the author of 40 books and more than 6,000 articles and other publications. He is a contributing editor to the Encyclopædia Britannica, a research fellow at the Southwest Center of the University of Arizona, and a lecturer in the Eller School of Management, at the University of Arizona. For more about him, visit his web page at www.gregorymcnamee.com.

Contact Info: gregorymcnamee@gmail.com / (520) 615-7955

VIRTUAL For The Love of Turquoise with Carrie Cannon

Turquoise has a long standing tradition amongst Native cultures of the Southwest, holding special significance and profound meanings to specific individual tribes. Even before the more contemporary tradition of combining silver with turquoise, cultures throughout the southwest used turquoise in necklaces, earrings, mosaics, fetishes, medicine pouches, and made bracelets of basketry stems lacquered with piñon resin and inlaid turquoise. Turquoise has been combined with other decorative elements such as shell, jet, and corral, and was part of an elaborate trade network extending to far reaching regions. Found on six continents across the world, turquoise forms in arid regions through the process of water seeping through rock and interacting with copper, aluminum, and iron deposits. In the southwest, used decoratively for millennia, this iconic art form has a compelling story all its own. This talk explores a long tradition of distinctive cultural styles, history, and transition of this wondrous stone.

Carrie Cannon is a member of the Kiowa tribe of Oklahoma and is also of Oglala Lakota descent. She has a B.S. in Wildlife Biology, and an M.S. in Resource Management. She began working for the Hualapai Tribe of Peach Springs, Arizona in 2005 where she began the creation of an intergenerational ethnobotany program for the Hualapai community. She is currently employed as an Ethnobotanist for the Hualapai Department of Cultural Resources. She administers a number of projects promoting the intergenerational teaching of Hualapai ethnobotanical knowledge working towards preservation and revitalization to ensure tribal ethnobotanical knowledge persists as a living practice and tradition.

Contact Info: calisay17@hotmail.com / (928) 727-1338

VIRTUAL From ‘Chief’ to Code Talker: Four Profiles of Navajo Code Talkers with Laura Tohe

During WWII a select group of young Navajo men enlisted in the Marines with a unique weapon. Using the Navajo language, they devised a secret code that the enemy never deciphered. For over 40 years a cloak of secrecy hung over the Code Talker’s service until the code was declassified and they were finally honored for their military contributions in the South Pacific by Presidents Reagan, Bush, and the Navajo Nation. The Code Talkers’ cultural background, how the code was devised and used, historical photos, and how Navajo spiritual beliefs were used to treat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) form this presentation.

Laura Tohe is Diné. She is Sleepy Rock clan born for the Bitter Water clan. She holds a Ph.D. in Indigenous American Literature. A librettist and an award-winning poet, her books include No Parole Today, Meeting the Spirit of Water, Sister Nations, Tséyi, Deep in the Rock, and Code Talker Stories. Her commissioned libretto, Enemy Slayer: A Navajo Oratorio, was performed by the Phoenix Symphony. Her new work, Nahasdzaan in the Glittering World, makes its world premiere in France 2019. She is Professor Emerita with Distinction at Arizona State University and is the Navajo Nation Poet Laureate for 2015-2019.

Contact Info: l.tohe@asu.edu / (480) 820-8358

VIRTUAL Hidden Voices, Silent Stories of the Underground Overground Railroad with Dr. Tamika Sanders

Using storytelling, activities and songs, this presentation will depict the ingenuity and resiliency used by those involved in the Underground Railroad to help over 100,000 slaves escape to freedom between 1810 and 1850. It will also tell the story of the “Green Book,” developed by Victor Hugo to provide Black travelers with a network of safe spaces they could travel, live and work despite illegal and legally sanctioned discrimination through Jim Crow laws. Both of these historical events are examples of communities coming together to fight the color line that divides America. More than ever, these stories need to be told to show the power communities have when they stand together in the face of injustice.

Dr. Tamika Sanders is an entrepreneur who decided to become an educator to help address the lack of minority faculty in higher education, and serve as a role model for minority students who rarely see people of color in academia. Through her company Savvy Pen, Dr. Sanders prides herself on working with schools to build inclusive classrooms, conducting multicultural training for educators, and creating interactive programs that incorporate arts learning to bridge cultural and socioeconomic divides. She hopes to continue using the arts to break barriers, unite people, and create social change.

Contact Info: info@savvypen.com / (480) 266-9747

VIRTUAL The History of the (Berlin) Wall: German Experiences for Arizona with Dr. Albrecht Classen

The issue of the border to Mexico, or any border today, is of central importance. This paper takes the history of the Berlin Wall as a starting point to address what walls have done to people and cultures throughout time. Can the Berlin Wall help us in Arizona to understand the critical issues better? Even if that might not be the case, the history of that ominous wall and the cultural implications deserve our close attention.

Dr. Albrecht Classen is a university distinguished professor of German Studies at the University of Arizona – where he teaches and researches the European Middle Ages, the early modern age, and modern German-speaking lands, focusing on literature, the visual arts, politics, philosophy, and religion. He has published more than 100 scholarly books, such as On the Forest in Medieval Literature(2015) and Toleration and Tolerance in Medieval Literature(2018). He has given lectures all over the state of Arizona, the nation, and globally. Over the last 30 years, he has received numerous teaching, research, and service awards, and has been repeatedly nominated for the Dan Shilling Public Humanities Scholar Award.

Contact Info: aclassen@email.arizona.edu / (520) 327-7609

VIRTUAL Honky Tonks, Brothels and Mining Camps: Entertainment in Old Arizona with Jay Cravath

In pioneer Arizona, among the best places to experience the performing arts were in the mining towns. Striking it rich meant having disposable income and miners, like the well-heeled of the Gilded Age, wanted to demonstrate their sophistication with culture. From the early popular music of ragtime and minstrelsy during the forming of these communities evolved orchestras, opera and glee clubs—all in hamlets like Tombstone. Here, a miner off shift at the Bird Cage could enjoy the proceedings while gambling at a table, or listen behind drawn curtains with a companion of his choice. Perhaps the most popular form of musical entertainment was the concert band, in shells and stages throughout the state.

ay Craváth, Ph.D. is a composer, writer, and scholar in the field of music and Indigenous studies. He crafts programs from these interests into interactive discussions that include stories, musical performance, and illustrations/photography. One of his most recent publication is Iretaba: Mohave Chief and American Diplomat. Dr. Craváth will begin an Arizona tour in late May of 2017 for his latest album: Songs for Ancient Days.

Dan is the former executive director of Arizona Humanities, where he worked for nearly 20 years. Since leaving AH, Shilling has co-directed three NEH summer institutes on environmental ethics, given dozens of presentations on place-based economic development, and authored or edited several publications, including Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Learning from Indigenous Methods for Environmental Sustainability(Cambridge 2018). A former high school teacher, Dan holds a PhD in literature from ASU. He has served on dozens of boards and commissions. To acknowledge his many contributions to the state, ASU presented him its most prestigious honor, the Distinguished Alumnus Award.

Contact Info: cravath@gmail.com / (928) 231-9754

VIRTUAL Hyenas in Petticoats: How Women Struggled Against Every Dirty Trick in the Book to Win The Vote! with Jana Bommersbach

For a century, women struggled to win the vote–Western women had it better than their Eastern Sisters, but never tell an Arizona
suffragette they had it easy. The deck was stacked against women, but their continued efforts led to the 19th Amendment, and since
1920, when all American women could vote, their voting strength has become crucial. Looking back at how they fought, how they
endured, how they suffered, is a look at one of the nation’s most important civil rights movements.

Jana Bommersbach is one of Arizona’s most honored and respected journalists. She has won accolades in every facet of her career— investigative reporter, magazine columnist, television commentator and author of nationally acclaimed books. She currently writes for True West magazine, digging up the true stories behind the popular myths, with an emphasis on Arizona’s real history and women of the Old West. Her insight, knowledge and wit produce exuberant, riveting speeches that always garner rave reviews.

Contact Info: janabomm25@yahoo.com / (602) 918-9906

VIRTUAL Lives of Arizonans from Memoirs and Fiction with Jim Turner

Arizona pioneers tell their stories in diaries, letters, and memoirs. Martha Summerhayes’s beloved Vanished Arizona and Captain John Bourke’s On the Border with Crook, plus biographies of Hopi, Pima, and Tohono O’odham women describe their lives and feelings. But we’ll also look at fiction, including Willa Cather’s Death Comes for the Archbishop, Zane Gray’s Riders of the Purple Sage, and contemporary authors like Marguerite Noble’s Filaree and Nancy Turner’s These is My Words. Richly illustrated with historic photographs and artwork, this presentation gives audiences a personal understanding of what life was like for Native Americans and pioneer emigrants.

Before retiring from the Arizona Historical Society, Jim Turner worked with more than 70 museums across the state. He co-authored the 4th-grade textbook The Arizona Story, and his pictorial history, Arizona: Celebration of the Grand Canyon State, was a 2012 Southwest Books of the Year selection. Jim moved to Tucson in 1951, earned a M.A. in U.S. history in 1999, and has been presenting Arizona history for more than forty years. Jim is an author/editor for Rio Nuevo Publishers, author of The Mighty Colorado from the Glaciers to the Gulf and Four Corners USA: Wonders of the American Southwest.

Contact Info: jimturnerhistorian@gmail.com / (520) 576-8678

VIRTUAL Mescal Agave Use in Arizona: Food, Fiber and Vessel with Carrie Cannon

There are approximately 300 mescal agave species in the world native to the Southwest United States and Mexico, with 24 species occurring in Arizona.  The agave plant was used for numerous utilitarian items that were used by virtually all Native peoples where this species is found. Mescal served as a valuable food source still being harvested and prepared to this day by many Indigenous groups.  For millennia people have pit roasted the heart of the plant yielding a nutritious food staple rich in calcium and zinc.  Leaf fibers can be crushed and used as an ingredient in pottery. Leaves are used for making utilitarian items including rope, hunting nets, and sandals; stalks are used for arrow quivers. This talk includes the life history of mescal, and the multitude of Tribal uses of this intriguing plant and their long relationship with this plant from centuries ago to the modern era.

Carrie Cannon is a member of the Kiowa tribe of Oklahoma and is also of Oglala Lakota descent. She has a B.S. in Wildlife Biology, and an M.S. in Resource Management. She began working for the Hualapai Tribe of Peach Springs, Arizona in 2005 where she began the creation of an intergenerational ethnobotany program for the Hualapai community. She is currently employed as an Ethnobotanist for the Hualapai Department of Cultural Resources. She administers a number of projects promoting the intergenerational teaching of Hualapai ethnobotanical knowledge working towards preservation and revitalization to ensure tribal ethnobotanical knowledge persists as a living practice and tradition.

Contact Info: calisay17@hotmail.com / (928) 727-1338

VIRTUAL The Science of Music, The Music of Science with Janice Jarrett

Why would so many physicists compare the universe to an orchestra? Why did Einstein use his violin playing to enhance his contemplation of the workings of the cosmos? The connection of music to science was illuminated early on when Pythagorus divided a string. Not surprisingly, from astro physicists to quantum theorists, the common key to unlocking mysteries is math. And clearly, the study of sound, acoustics and the vibrational spectrum intricately entwine science and music through mathematical computations. Understanding music’s physiological effects on our brains and the body is the goal of a growing number of studies by neuroscientists. Learn about the correlations between these two overlapping worlds and why so many high professionals are musicians and musicians, scientists.

Janice Jarrett has extensive experience teaching in schools, colleges, community programs and as a speaker, from numerous free lance talks, to Arts Encounters (UA Presents), to the Arizona Humanities Council. Post Ph.D. she continued her scholarly interdisciplinary research including music and the brain, science, healing, and in culture. She runs a private music studio and like many musicians, she is a multi-professional: adding jazz singer, lyricist, arranger, band leader and journalist. She earned her Ph.D. in Ethnomusicology, a masters in World Music, and a B.A. in voice and composition.

Contact Info: jjjazz@mac.com/ (520) 888-2690

VIRTUAL The Shadow Catchers: 150 Years of Arizona Photography with Jim Turner

For more than a century and a half some of the world’s best photographers focused their lenses on Arizona. In addition to the renowned Edward S. Curtis, Kate Cory lived with the Hopi and represented them in photographs and on canvas while C. S. Fly gave us the famous Geronimo pictures. In the 20th century Josef Muench’s pictures brought the movies to Monument Valley, Dorothea Lange captured Dust Bowl families, Barry Goldwater depicted Navajo and Hopi culture, and Ansel Adams glorified Arizona’s skies, canyons, and mesas.

Before retiring from the Arizona Historical Society, Jim Turner worked with more than 70 museums across the state. He co-authored the 4th-grade textbook The Arizona Story, and his pictorial history, Arizona: Celebration of the Grand Canyon State, was a 2012 Southwest Books of the Year selection. Jim moved to Tucson in 1951, earned a M.A. in U.S. history in 1999, and has been presenting Arizona history for more than forty years. Jim is an author/editor for Rio Nuevo Publishers, author of The Mighty Colorado from the Glaciers to the Gulf and Four Corners USA: Wonders of the American Southwest.

Contact Info: jimturnerhistorian@gmail.com / (520) 576-8678

VIRTUAL Sorting Through Southwest Arizona Tribal Symbols with Royce and Debbie Manuel

Symbols come in a variety of forms and found can be found in art, speech, or in writing. Knowing and understanding the southwest symbolism from a tribal perspective is one more Arizona celebrates its heritage. Today symbols among tribal nations describe life or convey a much deeper meaning in clothing, footwear, baskets designs and even etched animals designs along the freeway. Join Royce & Debbie together to learn more about translating the beautiful meaning from everyday southwest symbols.

As a tribal member of the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, Royce Manuel has long played an important role in perpetuating cultural knowledge within the tribal nation by service to the Auk Mierl Aw-Aw-Thum. Royce maintains the distinction of keeping the Calendar Stick. Today, he continues to record and initiate collaborative projects that will engage the Aw-Thum (O’odham) sister tribes in creative strategies of integrating the Calendar Stick concepts into projects, design, wellness, math, science and critical learning.

Debbie Nez-Manuel (Diné) has a Masters in Social Work, Arizona State University and is experienced in both non-profit and tribal communities. Debbie’s traditional and bi-cultural lifestyles, provides valuable insight and practices in both urban and tribal community settings while preserving, strengthening, and renewing cultural identity.

Contact Info: headquarters@debbienezmanuel.com / (480) 406-9152

VIRTUAL Tucson’s Black Community and School Segregation with Bernard Wilson

In 1909 the Territory of Arizona amended its compulsory school attendance bill to give cities and counties the ability to segregate their schools. Inspired by the change in the law, the Tucson school board conducted a rapid search of available buildings within the city. The school trustees selected a building that begun life as a dairy and by 1909 was an abandoned mortuary. This decision, best described as macabre and cadaverous, sparked outrage throughout the city of Tucson. Shocked by this unsettling turn of events, Tucson’s Black community, white clergy and newspaper editorials banded together to argue against the use of the building citing the mephitis odor of dead bodies and animal feces. Despite pleas and outrage Tucson’s school board trustees would not yield resulting in a stand-off between Black parents and the school board. Tucson’s only colored school remained open for one year with four students for a few months and approximately two-years later was replaced by the Dunbar school. This presentation seeks to explore the Tucson school board trustees’ decision to segregate the school system and the impact it had on the children, the Black community, and the city.

Bernard Wilson is an independent researcher, who began his humanities research as part of a personal genealogical investigation into his family. He has spent the past twenty-three years researching Tucson’s African-American pioneers and community. His first book, The Black Residents of Tucson and Their Achievements: A Reference Guide, exposed that Tucson had a large and thriving African- American community that included mining millionaires. His subsequent publications derived from the research for his book. Currently, his research focuses on the individual lives of the Old Pueblo’s African-Americans.

Contact Info: bjwilsonassociates@yahoo.com / (520) 579-3437

VIRTUAL Women Airforce Service Pilots of World War II with Natalie Stewart-Smith

Over one thousand women served as Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) during WWII. The missions they flew, allowed male pilots to take on combat roles at a critical time during the war. This presentations shares their story, as fliers, as women, and as patriots who fought for the right to be called veterans.

Natalie J. Stewart-Smith has been an educator for over 25 years and taught at the elementary, high school, and college levels. As a former Army officer and historian, she is interested in women’s contributions to the military, particularly those who served as military aviators.

Contact Info: waspsfly@gmail.com / (575) 921-5352

Host Site Toolkit

Promoting your AZ Speaks Program(s)

Arizona Humanities requires that host organizations generate publicity for each program and make all efforts to host a well-attended program. Organizations must add the Arizona Humanities logo or the language “This program is made possible by Arizona Humanities” to all publicity materials (flyers, press release, website, postcards, etc.)

Visit our Logos page for all high-resolution logos.

The more you can share your program with different audiences, the more that people understand the role and the importance of the humanities.

Ideas to help market the program in your community:

  • Once your program application is approved, begin marketing 4-6 weeks prior to the date of the program
  • Create a flyer/poster/postcard for your venue
  • Include the program announcement on your website
  • Add your program to community calendar listings
  • Send out an email to your e-mail list
  • Write and submit a press release to local media announcing the program
  • Post about the program on social media
  • Share the program announcement with local schools, city council, libraries, tourism board/visitors center, chamber of commerce, professional society newsletters
  • Invite your elected congressional officials and/or their staff

Arizona Humanities also helps promote AZ Speaks programs to our statewide audiences.

All programs are added to the:

  • Arizona Humanities website Events Calendar
  • Monthly Humanities Happenings e-blast to programs subscribers

Selected programs are highlighted in the:

  • Monthly E-newsletter
  • Social Media – facebook, twitter, instagram

Social Media Sample Posts

Facebook:

  • We are excited to announce that [Speaker Name] from @AZhumanities #AZspeaks will be coming to [your organization’s name] on [date/time] We can’t wait! [Insert links if needed]
  • Great news! [Your organization’s name] will be hosting [Speaker name] from the @AZhumanities #AZspeaks roster on [date/time] [Insert speaker photo/ link if needed]

Twitter:

  • [Your organization’s name] will host [Speaker name] from @AZhumanities on [date/time]  
  • [Your organization’s name] is excited to announce that [Speaker name] will be at [Location] on [date/time] Join us to explore [Subject/Title]

Instagram:

  • [Your organization’s name] will host [Speaker name] from the @AZhumanities #AZspeaks program on [date/time]. Join us to learn more about [title/presentation description] #AZhumanities
  • So excited to announce that [your organization’s name] will host [Speaker name] from the @AZhumanities #AZspeaks program on [date/time]. Explore [title/subject description] #AZhumanities

Arizona Humanities Logo and Signage

Arizona Humanities requires public acknowledgment of the programs it supports, as outlined in the terms and conditions of your award. Federal regulations stipulate that credit be given to Arizona Humanities-funded programs in all written notices, news releases, or other publicity. AZ Speaks host sites must specify that the program is made possible by Arizona Humanities. The name of Arizona Humanities and its logo must appear in a conspicuous location and be large enough to be easily legible. 

All logo formats are available on the Logos page

Signage

On the day of the presentation, please print out a poster or sign with the Arizona Humanities logo for your podium or in the room where the program will take place.

Audience Evaluations

Audience Evaluations are required for each AZ Speaks program. Please print and distribute to your audience on the day of the presentation. Do not modify the evaluation form without prior approval. Please note: this is not the Project Director evaluation. The Project Director evaluation is located within the on Grants and Programs Dashboard. Once completed, the audience evaluations must be uploaded into the Project Director Evaluation or mailed to the Arizona Humanities office (1242 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004).

Please use the NEW evaluation and discontinue use of old evaluations for audiences.

Talking Points

If you are creating newsletter articles, e-mails, social media posts, or press releases, here are some talking points about Arizona Humanities. This also includes a brief overview of the organization in case you find yourself needing to explain background and history of Arizona Humanities.

  • The mission of Arizona Humanities is to build a just and civil society by creating opportunities to explore our shared human experiences through discussion, learning and reflection.
  • For over 40 years, Arizona Humanities has strived to help Arizonans better understand themselves and the world around them through grants to organizations and public programs that explore the human experience.
  • Arizona Humanities is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization and the Arizona affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
  • Visit azhumanities.org for more information about Arizona Humanities.

Sample Introduction for Host Sites

”Good [morning, afternoon, evening], and thank you all for coming today. I am pleased to introduce [Name of Speaker], an AZ Speaks presenter from Arizona Humanities.

 [Read highlights from Speakers Bio]

This presentation is a program of Arizona Humanities, a non-profit organization that inspires individuals to enjoy and share a life of learning. Arizona Humanities funds the AZ Speaks programs throughout the state thanks to support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, and you.

In addition to the AZ Speaks program, Arizona Humanities supports other humanities projects like grants, community conversations, film screenings and discussion, author talks, and more. For more information about Arizona Humanities, visit www.azhumanities.org.

And now please join me in welcoming [name of Speaker] who will present, [Name of Presentation].”

Press Release Template

Arizona Humanities offers a customizeable press release template for AZ Speaks host sites when announcing speaker presentations.

AZ Speaks Press Release Template (Word Doc)

For scheduling support,
please call (602)257-0335 or email info@azhumanities.org