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Prescott Public Library

215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
928-777-1509 http://www.prescottlibrary.info/

October 2014

Your Brain and Music: Can Music Make You Smarter, Happier, Healthier?

October 2, 2014 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

Many neuroscientists study music to elucidate mysteries of the brain. Why is music such a rich resource? Not only can scientists physically track the process of learning music as different areas of the brain light up, they can trace music’s powerful effect on our emotions, muscles and memory. The benefits of music span well beyond entertainment and many believe music will be the healing art of the future. Accumulating data about our “brain on music” unmistakably supports howimportant, positive and…

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November 2014

Ghost Towns of the Second World War: Arizona’s Historic Military Sites

November 6, 2014 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
+ Google Map
Free

During the Second World War, Arizona’s open spaces, sparse population, and mild weather made it an ideal location for a wide range of military operations including combat training, POW camps, and flight training.  By war’s end, more pilots received their wings in Arizona than in any other state.  This presentation discusses the war’s impact on Arizona with a special focus on those sites that still have significant features, foundations, or remains from the war period.  Using both historic and contemporary…

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December 2014

Sustainability Issues in Arizona: A Moral Responsibility?

December 4, 2014 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

Join Goodwin in a conversation about sustainability issues facing Arizona. Topics can include the coal-burning Navajo Generating Station, the Colorado River dams, uranium mining around the Grand Canyon, wind turbines, water conservation and catchment, the costs of water and electricity, preservation of natural landscapes, and others. The presentation can be focused on one or more issues. Background information about these topics will be provided, but the presentations will focus on what personal, moral, legal, or policy issues are involved. The…

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January 2015

Hopi Quilting: Stitched Traditions from an Ancient Community

January 8, 2015 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

For centuries, Hopi men grew cotton and wove the fibers into blankets and clothing. In the 1880s, with the arrival of Anglo missionaries and government officials, quilting was introduced to the Hopi people and it quickly became integrated into Hopi culture and ceremony with quilts being used in every Hopi household. Hopis today are 4th and 5th generation quiltmakers and as the artistic traditions of two cultures are blended, it is not uncommon to see a quilt with a traditional…

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February 2015

Oh, The Shape We’re In!: How Arizona’s and the Western States’ Borders Were Determined

February 5, 2015 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

The original 13 colonies and their influence on our country’s expansion to the Pacific, along with how Arizona’s growth led it to become the 48th state, illustrate the connection between geography, politics, economics, and social forces, all of which played a role in the determination of the state borders west of the Appalachian Mountains.  Thomas Jefferson, Jefferson Davis, “manifest destiny,” gold strikes, treaties, land purchases, railroads, and wars are just a few of the people, events, and ideas that influenced…

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March 2015

Saving the Great American West:  The Story of George Bird Grinnell

March 5, 2015 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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The great West that George Bird Grinnell first encountered in 1870 as a 21-year-old man was shortly to disappear before his eyes.  Nobody was quicker to sense the desecration or was more eloquent in crusading against the poachers, the hide-hunters, and the disengaged U.S. Congress than George Bird Grinnell, the “Father of American Conservation.”  Grinnell founded the first Audubon Society, co-founded the Boone and Crockett Club with Teddy Roosevelt, and led the effort to establish Glacier National Park.  Audiences will…

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April 2015

Honky Tonks, Brothels and Mining Camps: Entertainment in Old Arizona

April 2, 2015 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
+ Google Map
Free

In pioneer Arizona, among the best places to experience the performing arts were in the mining towns. Striking it rich meant having disposable income and miners, like the well-heeled of the Gilded Age, wanted to demonstrate their sophistication with culture. From the early popular music of ragtime and minstrelsy evolved orchestras, operas and glee clubs that performed in Tombstone and other hamlets. Perhaps the most popular form of musical entertainment was the concert band, in shells and stages throughout the…

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May 2015

Barnstormers, Daredevils, and Flying Waitresses

May 7, 2015 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

Before women could vote, they could fly. Everyone knows of Amelia Earhart, but few recognize and appreciate the courage and struggles of the women who came before her. Join Renzi as he shares the stories of pioneering women who served as pilots and aerial performers. Learn about Harriet Quimby, the first woman to fly across the English Channel, doing so in a plane that was little more than a box kite with a propeller. These determined women risked their lives…

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June 2015

Grand Canyon Through a Hiker’s Eye

June 4, 2015 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

This presentation follows Martin’s various hikes in Grand Canyon National Park, from Lee’s Ferry to the Grand Wash Cliffs at Lake Mead. Follow along as Martin explores the Grand Canyon’s remote regions where there are few trails. Many of his hikes are day hikes that start at the Colorado River, while others are more traditional backpacking expeditions. Either way, Martin’s over forty years of exploration of the Grand Canyon ensures that audiences will see and learn about parts of this…

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January 2016

Arizona Ghost Towns

January 7, 2016 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

Ghost towns dot Arizona's landscape and provide unique insights into a diverse history. Some ghost towns tell a boom-to-bust story with few remaining traces of the people who once lived there, while others, like Jerome, have become thriving tourist destinations. Many are old mining locations that once bustled with life, while others tell more modern stories, showing the impact of highways rerouted and roads not taken. This program will feature stories of ghost towns such as Crown King, Jerome, and…

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February 2016

Father Kino: Journey to Discovery

February 4, 2016 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

Father Kino is one of two Arizonans recognized in the U. S. Capitol Hall of Heroes.  The Padre was a mathematician, astronomer, geographer, map maker, explorer, rancher, and friend to the Indians of the Pimería Alta.  Journeying on horseback or foot, multiple explorations of the Pimería Alta were made by the padre, resulting in the first detailed map of the area.  He proved Baja California was not an island.  He traveled trails mostly unknown to outsiders through inhabited territory of…

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March 2016

Written in Thread: Arizona Women’s History preserved in their Quilts

March 3, 2016 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

Written in Thread: Arizona Women’s History preserved in their Quilts traces the history of Arizona through women who recorded pieces of their lives in their needlework.  The colorful patterns of women’s quilts added a spot of brightness to their homes and their lives. They also celebrated and recorded special events with their quilts. Beginning with Mexican women of the 1860s, through Hopi women of the 1990s, this lecture introduces some of the women who pioneered Arizona through the quilts they…

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April 2016

How the Canyon Diablo Train Robbers Escaped the Death Penalty

April 7, 2016 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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In March 1889, four men robbed the Atlantic Pacific train near Canyon Diablo. The robbers were eventually caught in what became an epic manhunt that lasted nearly two and a half weeks, and covered a reported 300 miles. The robbery also served as the first test case for a new Arizona law making train robbery a capital offense. The bandits eventually pled guilty, but were not sentenced to death. Instead, they received sentences ranging from twenty-five to thirty years. This…

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May 2016

The Mighty Colorado River: From its Sources to the Sea

May 5, 2016 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

Jim Turner has traced the Green and Colorado rivers from their beginnings as clear bubbling glacial springs high in the mountains, then through roaring canyons in Utah, Arizona, and Nevada, and finally to the salt flats in Mexico. Stunning photographs tell the story of the rivers’ two thousand miles of scenic wonders, geography, wildlife, history, recreation, politics, and local culture. Before retiring from the Arizona Historical Society, Jim Turner worked with more than 70 museums in every corner of the…

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June 2016

Native in a Strange Land: The Life of Mike Burns, Indian Scout

June 2, 2016 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Mike Burns lived a long life in two worlds. Born in about 1862 into the Kwevkepaya (Yavapai) people, he was taken prisoner by U.S. soldiers after his family was massacred at a place called Skeleton Cave. He lived for years as something between a captive and a servant until joining the Indian Scouts, riding against Sitting Bull after the Battle of Little Bighorn and Geronimo in the Apache Wars. Gregory McNamee, the editor of Burns’s memoir The Only One Living…

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July 2016

Telling It Like It Was: Interviews with Arizona Pioneer Women

July 7, 2016 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

During the Depression the Federal Writers Project conducted interviews with over 144 women who arrived in the Territory between 1850 and 1890. The women spoke of their long and dangerous journeys, and with their words paint pictures of the hardships and life threatening situations of their frontier existence. Through hard work, dedication, tenacity and humor they conquered and helped make a state. Hear the story of the original Arizona pioneer families including the Udalls, Flakes, Kartchners, Luceros, Romeros, and Jennings.…

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August 2016

Pearl Hart, the Lady Bandit- Victim or Vixen… or Both?

August 4, 2016 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Separating fact from fiction is no easy task when it comes to flamboyant stage coach robber Pearl Hart. A mountain of conflicting stories abound, thanks in no small part, to Pearl herself. So enamored of the Wild West, she embellished her own tale to accommodate the interest of newspapers and public fascination. This presentation will follow Pearl from her modest beginnings in Canada and discover what set her down the road that led from Canada to Ohio, Illinois, New Mexico,…

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September 2016

“Armed with Our Language, We Went to War: The Navajo Code Talkers”

September 1, 2016 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

During WWII a select group of young Navajo men enlisted in the Marines with a unique weapon. Using the Navajo language, they devised a secret code that the enemy never deciphered.  For over 40 years a cloak of secrecy hung over the Code Talker’s service until the code was declassified and they were finally honored for their military contributions in the South Pacific by Presidents Reagan, Bush, and the Navajo Nation. The Code Talkers’ cultural background, how the code was…

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October 2016

Adventurous Spirits: Arizona’s Women Artists, 1900-1950

October 6, 2016 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

Before WWII, the resident art community of Arizona was comprised mostly of women, and this talk explores these independent spirits. Kate Cory, one of the first to arrive in 1905, chronicled the Hopi mesas. Marjorie Thomas was Scottsdale’s the first resident artist. Lillian Wilhelm Smith came to the state to illustrate the works of Zane Grey. Impressionist Jessie Benton Evans’s Scottsdale villa became a social center for local artists. Mary-Russell Ferrell Colton and her husband Harold founded the Museum of…

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November 2016

Who Did You Say Was Here?

November 3, 2016 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

While doing research on our centennial book, Lisa Schnebly Heidinger developed a treasure trove of anecdotes that wove through the tapestry Arizona, and can custom fit a presentation to any audience, based on geography, interest and local population.  These include but are not limited to little heard details about famous figures (like when the Bucky O’Neill statue was lost and Clark Gable’s adventure in Northern Arizona) and poignant stories of characters we haven’t all met yet, such as John D.…

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December 2016

Working in the Salt Mine: Native American Salt Mining In Arizona

December 1, 2016 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Salt has been a valuable trade item throughout human history. Native American salt procurement in the Southwest involved dangerous journeys across sacred landscapes associated with a deity called Salt Woman. This presentation describes the history of a famous salt mine in Camp Verde, Arizona, where prehistoric Sinagua tools used for mining salt were discovered in the 1920s by historic miners deep inside tunnels dug into a thick, fresh-water salt deposit. Numerous photographs are shown of these well-preserved, 700-year old tools…

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January 2017

The Life and Times of Tom Jeffords, Friend of Cochise – Prescott

January 5, 2017 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

Tom Jeffords grew up in Ashtabula, OH, without much education and was promoted to lake captain in his early twenties. The lure of making his fortune called Tom west to the Pike’s Peak Gold Rush, the San Juan Rush and to the Colorado River. He scouted and was dispatch rider for the Army during the Civil War and was present at its bloodiest battle. After the war, he prospected, scouted and helped start Tucson’s mail service. Along the way, he…

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February 2017

Van Buren: Arizona’s Sunset Strip – Prescott

February 2, 2017 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Have you ever believed in a street? That’s right, a real belief in what a street stands for in the midst of a bustling city. Many recall the heyday of Van Buren Street, linking Arizona, California and New Mexico, the only highway known in the early 1900’s. Neon lights, bright, colorful lodges, hotels and motels, proud to advertise swimming pools! Over the years, Van Buren has offered everything imaginable, including an insane asylum, where Winnie Ruth Judd, the trunk murderess,…

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March 2017

Plants, Inspiring the People: Reflections on Hualapai Ethnobotany of the Grand Canyon – Prescott

March 2, 2017 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

Plants, Inspiring the People: Reflections on Hualapai Ethnobotany of the Grand Canyon Where lies the cure to diabetes? “Ask the prickly pear, or the mesquite bean pod…maybe they will tell you.” This is the answer you may hear from elder instructors of the Hualapai Ethnobotany Youth Project. The ethnobotanical story of the Hualapai Tribe  begins with the plant knowledge the people have inherited from their great grandparents who lived entirely off the land. Hualapai grandchildren  live in a completely different…

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April 2017

Arizona’s Unsolved Mysteries – Prescott

April 6, 2017 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

We are intrigued by unsolved mysteries, because it would seem almost impossible for anyone to totally vanish from the face of the earth at any time. This is especially true in our day and age when a host of computer data tracks everyone; yet bodies do disappear with astonishing frequency. In some cases it may be presumed that people wished to disappear, but then why? Even more unsettling is the realization that certain people may have gotten away with the…

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May 2017

Meteorites Among Ancient Native American Cultures – Prescott

May 4, 2017 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

The occurrence of meteorites on archaeological sites in North America has been known since the early 19th century. From the Hopewell culture in the eastern United States, to the Polar Eskimo, to the Indians in the American Southwest and northern Mexico, meteorites have been found on these ancient sites. Much like meteorite hunters of today, ancient Native American cultures actively engaged in meteorite collecting.  Although we cannot know if a meteorite fall was ever witnessed, the discovery of meteorites  at…

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June 2017

On the Arizona Frontier Ranch Medicine

June 1, 2017 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

Once your family arrived in the west often there was not a doctor within miles. The medical care of the family landed in the hands of the family. Luckily, it was soon learned that the plants held many secrets for someone who was ill. Chew a little willow bark for a headache, pine needles are rich in vitamin C, a spider web will close up a cut, and so much more. For this presentation a frontier medical bag is used…

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July 2017

The Woman Who Shot Cowboys: Rodeo Photographer Louise L. Serpa – Prescott

July 6, 2017 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Anyone who has ever stared down an angry bull coming full throttle across an arena will understand why rodeo photographer Louise Serpa often uttered the adage, “Never Don’t Pay Attention.” Born into New York society, Louise ended up out west with her nose buried in the dirt & her eye glued to a camera, becoming the first woman to venture inside the arena & shoot some of the most amazing photographs of rodeo action. The dust & dirt of the…

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August 2017

The Eagle and the Archaeologists: The Lindbergh’s 1929 Aerial Survey of Southwest Prehistoric Sites – Prescott

August 3, 2017 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Pilot Charles Lindbergh (the “Lone Eagle”) is best known for his famous 1927 flight across the Atlantic Ocean. But Lindbergh, and his wife Anne, also played an important role in southwestern archaeology. During the summer of 1929, they worked with noted archaeologist Alfred Kidder to conduct the first extensive aerial photographic survey of southwestern prehistoric sites; taking numerous photos and even landing at remote Canyon de Chelly. The presentation features many of their historic photographs and describes this important –…

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September 2017

Cowboys and Cowgirls: Icons of the American West – Prescott

September 7, 2017 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Few symbols have been more durable than the American cowboy. This program will give an overview of this populist figure, whose image was first defined by painters Frederic Remington and Charles M. Russell. Also important to the story are brave cowgirls and the Mexican vaqueros. Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show showcased mythic cowboy culture, with singing cowboys, pretty girls on horses, and plenty of Indians in his internationally popular extravaganzas that for many defined the American West. Arizona’s contribution to…

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October 2017

“A Man Would Be a Fool to Take a Chance on Me”: Violet M. Irving of Skull Valley Arizona, Iconic Arizona Woman – Prescott

October 5, 2017 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

Violet M. Irving, Liz Warren’s grandmother, spent most of her life in Skull Valley, Arizona, as the postmaster and owner of the general store. Born in 1900 in Walker, Vi was the daughter and granddaughter of miners. Her life spanned the century, and she witnessed statehood, two great wars, the Depression, and Rural Electrification first hand from her perch in south-west Yavapai County. Vi was an accomplished raconteur, and family meals always included many hours of stories about her life…

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January 2018

The Ancient Hohokam Ballgame of Arizona – Prescott

January 4, 2018 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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The ancient Hohokam culture of Arizona constructed at least 200 ball courts more than 800 years ago. These oval depressions were likely used to play a ball game that originated in southern Mexico, where the game was played with a rubber ball and had a very important role in reenacting the creation of humans in this world. This presentation will describe the recorded Hohokam ball courts located within Hohokam villages scattered throughout Arizona, summarize what archaeologists propose they were used…

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Riders on the Orphan Train: The Arizona Story – Prescott

January 27, 2018 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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“The Orphan Trains – Arizona’s Hidden History” will be presented at six libraries: Winslow, Prescott, Douglas, Fountain Hills, Wilcox and Prescott Valley. The program is designed to inform, entertain, and engage audiences of all ages and to tell the story of about this little-known chapter of the largest child migration in American and Arizona history and the local legacies of their relocation. The children’s experiences inspire reflection on the meaning of home inherent in the American Dream. More information at: http://www.ridersontheorphantrain.org/…

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February 2018

Dauntless Courage and Boundless Ambition: The Life of Buckey O’Neill – Prescott

February 1, 2018 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Buckey O’Neill was one of Arizona’s legendary pioneers, even author William MacLeod Raine called him “the most many-sided man Arizona has produced”. Before dying in Cuba while serving as one of Theodore Roosevelt’s Rough Riders, O’Neill made his mark in Arizona as a newspaper editor, sheriff, mayor, and prospector, among other professions. Whether chasing train robbers across the Arizona’s frontier, promoting the Grand Canyon as a tourist destination, or reforming education practices while serving as school superintendent, he lived with…

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March 2018

The Holocaust and Its Memory – Prescott

March 1, 2018 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

The Nazis in Germany committed the worst crimes against humanity in world history. The Holocaust will remain in our collective memory and reminds us constantly of the profound dangers that threaten modern society.  Democracy is a fragile construct. This presentation analyzes the causes and conditions for the rise of the Nazis in Germany, and traces the horrible history of the Holocaust through maps, images, and texts, focusing also on the culture practiced today in Germany in a most moving way. …

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April 2018

Rivers of Dreams: Stories and Music of Arizona’s Waterways – Prescott

April 5, 2018 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

Arizona’s rivers were first, lush green ribbons of life through a desert landscape. They became sustaining paths, first for the indigenous, later for immigrants leaving wagon tracks. On the Salt River, Hohokam built vast canals to direct water for irrigation. The first European citizens of Phoenix used these same trenches. The history, stories and songs are shared interactively. Jay Craváth, Ph.D. is a composer, writer, and scholar in the field of music and Indigenous studies. He crafts programs from these…

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May 2018

Hi Jolly and Mystery of the US Army Camel Corps – Prescott

May 3, 2018 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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This presentation will explore the US Army’s experiment with using camel from the Middle East to make it more mobile in the newly acquired Southwest.  In order to teach the soldiers about camels, a local from the Middle East, who was called Hi Jolly, was shipped over with the camels.  Even though Secretary of War Jefferson Davis desperately wanted the Camel Corps to be successful, the experiment was a failure.  Find out what happened to the camels and their minder,…

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January 2019

Arizona Stories: Frontier Characters and Communities – Prescott

January 20, 2019 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

From mammoth hunters and canal builders to Native Americans, Hispanics, Americans, Irish, Serbians, and just about every nationality under the sun, Arizona has always been a land of many cultures. And while the Earps and the Geronimo are world famous, Arizona can also be proud of its unsung men and women and cooperative communities. Here we will share Arizona’s experiences from the famous to the little known, from Native American ceremonies to mining booms, cattle drives, cotton harvests, and religious…

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February 2019

Cowpokes, Crooks, and Cactus: Arizona in the Movies (Prescott)

February 17, 2019 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Tyrone Power, Andy Devine,  Katy Jurado, Steve McQueen and, of course, John Wayne. From the earliest days of film, Arizona has been a setting and subject for hundreds of films. Some, like Junior Bonner and Red River, are considered classics, others, such as Billy Jack and Evolution, surely less so. Some may even be classics in the making, from Tombstone to Near Dark. In this entertaining talk, Gregory McNamee, a frequent contributor on film to the Encyclopaedia Britannica and former…

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March 2019

Hellraising, Heroic, and Hidden Women of the Old West (Prescott)

March 17, 2019 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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Free

Although history tries to tell us ONLY men settled the Old West, that is shattered by Jana's verbal tour through some of the amazing women who made all the difference. Any woman who came West in the 1800s had to be full of grit and spit to survive and Jana has collected the stories of dozens of women who prove it. Ever heard of Donaldina Cameron or Biddy Mason? Sharlot Hall or Pearl Hart—Arizona's infamous stagecoach robber? Jana reveals the…

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January 2020

“Hyenas in Petticoats”–How Women Struggled Against Every Dirty Trick in the Books to Win the Vote!

January 19, 2020 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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As we celebrate the 100th birthday of the 19th Amendment in 2020, it’s time to look back at the enormous effort it took for women to be granted full citizenship and the vote. History has downplayed suffrage, as if it were just a footnote in American history, when in fact, it was the nation’s largest civil rights movement. Western women got the vote long before their Eastern sisters, but don’t dare tell an Arizona suffragette that she had it easy.…

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February 2020

Honky Tonks, Brothels and Mining Camps: Entertainment in Old Arizona

February 16, 2020 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
+ Google Map

In pioneer Arizona, among the best places to experience the performing arts were in the mining towns. Striking it rich meant having disposable income, and miners, like the well-heeled of the Gilded Age, wanted to demonstrate their sophistication with culture. From the early popular music of ragtime and minstrelsy during the forming of these communities, evolved orchestras, opera and glee clubs—all in hamlets like Tombstone. Dr. Craváth shares stories and music of a time when performing live was the only…

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April 2020

CANCELED – The 1894 Lowell Expedition to Arizona

April 26, 2020 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin St.
Prescott, AZ 86303 United States
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In 1894 an Easterner named Andrew Douglass explored Arizona Territory in search of an ideal site to establish an astronomical observatory for Bostonian Percival Lowell. Traveling by train and stagecoach, Douglass visited Tombstone, Tucson, Tempe, Prescott and Flagstaff. While making scientific observations at each locale, he experienced a variety of unforeseen episodes. This expedition is a classic tale of western adventure with a twist of scientific intrigue. Kevin Schindler is an award-winning educator and writer who has worked for more…

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