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The Museum of Casa Grande

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The Museum of Casa Grande

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110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
520-836-2223 http://www.cgvhs.org/

November 2014

Desert Trader: Goldie Tracy Richmond, Trader, Trapper, and Quiltmaker

November 8, 2014 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
The Museum of Casa Grande, 110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
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Free

Goldie Tracy Richmond came to southwestern Arizona in 1927 where she lived in a canvas lean-to. To survive, Goldie mined, ran traplines, and operated Tracy’s Trading Post, living among the Tohono O’odham people for four decades. She was a large woman, and the stories told by the O’odham people of Goldie’s life are legendary. Goldie also made magnificent quilts with images of the desert landscape and Indian life; one was named one of the 100 most significant quilts of the…

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December 2014

The New Deal in Arizona

December 13, 2014 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
The Museum of Casa Grande, 110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
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Free

Arizona’s New Deal built sidewalks, post offices, provided school lunches and outhouses. It produced roadside shrines and monuments to encourage tourism, check dams and mud stock tanks to support Arizona ranchers, as well as golf courses and pools for recreation. The federal investment in the built and cultural landscape of 1930s Arizona and the nation was sweeping and continues to provide much of our infrastructure. This overview of President Roosevelt’s New Deal in Arizona highlights stories of local politics that…

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January 2015

The Eagle and the Archaeologists: The Lindberghs’ 1929 Southwest Aerial Survey

January 10, 2015 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
The Museum of Casa Grande, 110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
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Free

Charles Lindbergh is best known for his famous 1927 flight across the Atlantic Ocean.  But few realize that Lindbergh and his wife, Anne, played a brief but important role in archaeology.  In 1929 they teamed up with noted archaeologist Alfred Kidder to conduct an unprecedented aerial photographic survey of Southwest prehistoric sites and geologic features including Chaco Canyon, the Grand Canyon, and Canyon de Chelly.  Featuring Lindbergh’s historic photographs, this presentation describes this adventurous pioneering collaboration of aviation and archaeology.…

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February 2015

By the Time They Came to Phoenix:  African American Cotton Pickers in Arizona

February 14, 2015 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
The Museum of Casa Grande, 110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
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Free

Featuring a documentary that tells the stories of early African American cotton pickers in El Mirage and in other regions of Arizona, this presentation explores the lives of African Americans who came to the cotton fields from Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma during the 1940s through the 1960s.  These individuals made significant cultural, historical, and economic contributions to life in Arizona, from founding churches to serving as civic and social leaders.  Notable families include the Cutrights, Marshalls, and Dunbars.  …

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February 2016

Honky Tonks, Brothels and Mining Camps: Entertainment in Old Arizona

February 13, 2016 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
The Museum of Casa Grande, 110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
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Free

In pioneer Arizona, among the best places to experience the performing arts were in the mining towns. Striking it rich meant having disposable income and miners, like the well-heeled of the Gilded Age, wanted to demonstrate their sophistication with culture. From the early popular music of ragtime and minstrelsy during the forming of these communities evolved orchestras, opera and glee clubs—all in hamlets like Tombstone. Here, a miner off shift at the Bird Cage could enjoy the proceedings while gambling…

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March 2016

Arts and Culture of Ancient Southern Arizona Hohokam Indians

March 12, 2016 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
The Museum of Casa Grande, 110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
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Free

The Hohokam Native American culture flourished in southern Arizona from the sixth through fifteenth centuries. Hohokam artifacts, architecture, and other material culture provide archaeologists with clues for identifying where the Hohokam lived, interpreting how they adapted to the Sonoran Desert for centuries, and explaining why their culture mysteriously disappeared. In this presentation Dart illustrates the material culture of the Hohokam and present possible interpretations about their relationships to the natural world, time reckoning, religious practices, beliefs, and deities, and possible…

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October 2016

Arizona Ghost Towns

October 8, 2016 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
The Museum of Casa Grande, 110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
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Free

Ghost towns dot Arizona’s landscape and provide unique insights into a diverse history. Some ghost towns tell a boom-to-bust story with few remaining traces of the people who once lived there, while others, like Jerome, have become thriving tourist destinations. Many are old mining locations that once bustled with life, while others tell more modern stories, showing the impact of highways rerouted and roads not taken. This program will feature stories of ghost towns such as Crown King, Jerome, and…

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Arizona’s Unsolved Mysteries – Casa Grande

October 13, 2016 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
The Museum of Casa Grande, 110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
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Free

We are intrigued by unsolved mysteries, because it would seem almost impossible for anyone to totally vanish from the face of the earth at any time. This is especially true in our day and age when a host of computer data tracks everyone; yet bodies do disappear with astonishing frequency. In some cases it may be presumed that people wished to disappear, but then why? Even more unsettling is the realization that certain people may have gotten away with the…

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November 2016

Día de los Muertos: A Celebration of Life and Death

November 12, 2016 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
The Museum of Casa Grande, 110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
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Free

What is Día de los Muertos? Where did it come from, what are its roots? How do we celebrate it here in the U.S.? Día los Muertos or Days of the Dead is a significant and highly celebrated holiday in Mexico, Latin America, and Southwestern U.S. To understand Día de los Muertos one has to set aside preconceived notions. To many Mexicans, death is not a subject to be feared, ignored, or divorced from the living. One cannot celebrate life…

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Beautiful Games: American Indian Sport and Art

November 12, 2016 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
The Museum of Casa Grande, 110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
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Free

Similar to what a person can find in art, sport and games also come to us with good and bad qualities. When bad there is evidence of cheating, chauvinism, narcissism, civil unrest, and stereotypes. And when good we gain aspects of trust, cooperation, fairness, focus, patience, and control. The values gained in the practice of sports are instructive for life as they a place an emphasis on respect, fraternity and discipline, all three of which are synonymous with teaching and…

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December 2016

Native in a Strange Land: The Life of Mike Burns, Indian Scout

December 10, 2016 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
The Museum of Casa Grande, 110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
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Free

Mike Burns lived a long life in two worlds. Born in about 1862 into the Kwevkepaya (Yavapai) people, he was taken prisoner by U.S. soldiers after his family was massacred at a place called Skeleton Cave. He lived for years as something between a captive and a servant until joining the Indian Scouts, riding against Sitting Bull after the Battle of Little Bighorn and Geronimo in the Apache Wars. Gregory McNamee, the editor of Burns’s memoir The Only One Living…

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January 2017

Don Chun Wo, Unofficial Mayor of Tucson’s Chinatown

January 14, 2017 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
The Museum of Casa Grande, 110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
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Free

Don Chun Wo (1873-1945) was a prominent figure in the Chinese community of Tucson and later Casa Grande in the early decades of the 20th century. He enjoyed high social standing among the Chinese due to his success in running grocery store business, as well as in maintaining a viable family life. The latter was no small feat given the fact that most of the Chinese  who then lived in America were sojourning bachelors. He was also well respected by…

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February 2017

African American Pioneers of Arizona- Casa Grande

February 11, 2017 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
The Museum of Casa Grande, 110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
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Free

Featuring compelling documentaries based on interviews, this presentation shares stories about prominent African Americans who contributed to the life and culture of Arizona. Such luminaries include the late Dr. Eugene Grigsby, Betty Fairfax, Judge Jean Williams, Rev. Warren Stewart, Councilman Calvin Goode, and Carol Coles Henry. Each individual’s life is contextualized using prominent events that have taken place in Arizona and the impact his/her work had on the social, cultural and political lives of the state is discussed. Akua Duku…

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March 2017

Women of the Arizona State Prison

March 11, 2017 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
The Museum of Casa Grande, 110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
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Free

Winnie Ruth Judd, Eva Dugan, Dr. Rose Boido, and Eva Wilbur Cruz all shared one thing in common. They were all incarcerated at the Arizona State Prison in Florence.  These women were players in both the sensational stories that made national headlines and local stories that made Arizona history. Who were these women and how did they end up in the Florence prison? How did their stories impact Arizona? Through the use of photographs, prison records and newspaper articles, their…

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January 2018

Wrangling 1500 Wild Mustangs: Insights into the Wild Horse Controversy – Casa Grande

January 11, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
The Museum of Casa Grande, 110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
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Free

In 1989, Alan Day lobbied the United States Congress and was granted approval to create our country’s first government-sponsored wild horse sanctuary on his South Dakota ranch. At the time, the government housed roughly 2,000 horses in feedlots. Fifteen hundred of those wild mustangs came to live at Mustang Meadows Ranch where, for four years, Alan trained and cared for them. Today, the Bureau of Land Management holds over 60,000 wild mustangs in feedlots, and the number keeps growing. Why…

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February 2018

The Lives and Achievements of Tucson’s Unknown African American Pioneers, 1860-1910 – Casa Grande

February 8, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
The Museum of Casa Grande, 110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
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Free

Tucson’s African-American community overcame numerous scandals to become some of the city’s most prosperous and well-known citizens. Newspapers throughout the Arizona territory captured more than their unlawful exploits but gave biographical information about each African-American. Men like George Bragg, who was a barber by trade, made headlines that rocked when he was charged with the attempted murder of the railroad Superintendent and his family. Women like Fannie Garcia challenged social mores by using her millions to fight conviction for marrying…

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March 2018

Hellraising, Heroic and Hidden Women of the Old West – Casa Grande

March 8, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
The Museum of Casa Grande, 110 W. Florence Blvd
Casa Grande, AZ 85122 United States
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Free

Although history tries to tell us ONLY men settled the Old West, that is shattered by Jana’s verbal tour through some of the amazing women who made all the difference. Any woman who came West in the 1800s had to be full of grit and spit to survive and Jana has collected the stories of dozens of women who prove it. Ever heard of Donaldina Cameron or Biddy Mason? Sharlot Hall or Pearl Hart—Arizona’s infamous stagecoach robber? Jana reveals the…

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