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Saddlebrooke Mountain Clubhouse

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Saddlebrooke Mountain Clubhouse

38759 South Mountain View Boulevard
Tucson, AZ 85739 United States
805-886-7519

May 2014

Fascinating Florence, AZ: Not Just a Prison Town

May 21, 2014 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Saddlebrooke Mountain Clubhouse, 38759 South Mountain View Boulevard
Tucson, AZ 85739 United States
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Free

Florence began as a small rural desert town. In 1875 a major silver strike and designation as Pinal County seat changed the character of the town. Despite the past tales of shootouts and stage robberies that echo off the historic adobe walls, many people still find Florence the essence of a “small town” that is rapidly disappearing in Arizona. Learn how Florence’s unique historic district also reflects the wisdom of architectural response to desert environment. This presentation will highlight some…

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January 2015

Arizona Kicks on Route 66

January 15, 2015 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Saddlebrooke Mountain Clubhouse, 38759 South Mountain View Boulevard
Tucson, AZ 85739 United States
+ Google Map
Free

U.S. Route 66, known as the “Mother Road,” was built in 1926. It ran from Chicago to L. A. During the depression of the 1930s, it became the major path by which people migrated west, seeking work, warm weather and new opportunities. Shore shares the history of Route 66 in Arizona, including the impact it had on the state during its prime, and what happened when the interstate ultimately bypassed some of the towns that drew life from the road.…

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October 2015

This Land is Our Land: Early Women on the Arizona Frontier

October 15, 2015 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Saddlebrooke Mountain Clubhouse, 38759 South Mountain View Boulevard
Tucson, AZ 85739 United States
+ Google Map
Free

Meet five early Arizona women who endured troubles and hardships during the territory’s early days, all of whom brought a unique perspective to the raw land. Apache warrior Lozen fought to hold onto land once freely roamed by her people. Larcena Pennington crawled down the Santa Rita Mountains after surviving captivity by the Apaches. Mary Aguirre found traveling the 1300-mile Santa Fe Trail an exhilarating adventure. Ada Bass played an integral role in one of the first tourist businesses at…

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May 2017

Ghost Towns of the Second World War: Arizona’s Historic Military Sites

May 18, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Saddlebrooke Mountain Clubhouse, 38759 South Mountain View Boulevard
Tucson, AZ 85739 United States
+ Google Map
Free

When America entered the Second World War, Arizona’s sparse population and mild weather made it an ideal location for training facilities and prisoner of war camps.  By war’s end, Arizona had trained more pilots than any other state, hosted the country’s largest POW camp, and was part of the largest military training grounds in history.  This presentation tells Arizona’s war-time role by focusing on the stories of those WW2 sites in Arizona that still have significant remaining features from the…

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February 2019

Father Kino: Journey to Discovery (Tucson)

February 21 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Saddlebrooke Mountain Clubhouse, 38759 South Mountain View Boulevard
Tucson, AZ 85739 United States
+ Google Map
Free

Father Kino was a cartographer, explorer, geographer, scientist, and a man with a mission. Through his knowledge of agriculture, he introduced new livestock breeds and shared expertise on animal husbandry to native groups in the area. The new plants and fruit trees he brought to the New World introduced a variety of foods to eat and contributed to the advancement of agricultural techniques, such as how to withstand seasonal changes. His scientific knowledge allowed him to make new discoveries. Dr.…

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March 2019

River of Dreams: Stories and Music of Arizona’s Waterways (Tucson)

March 21 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Saddlebrooke Mountain Clubhouse, 38759 South Mountain View Boulevard
Tucson, AZ 85739 United States
+ Google Map
Free

Arizona’s rivers were first, lush green ribbons of life through a desert landscape. They became sustaining paths, first for the indigenous, later for immigrants leaving wagon tracks. On the Salt River, Hohokam built vast canals to direct water for irrigation. The first citizens of Phoenix used these same trenches. The Mohave tribes ruled the Colorado—that great western Nile, then gave way to the paddleboats of European explorers. The Gila provided sustenance for the Pima and passage for such brave adventurers…

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